Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Championship Productions Featured Items!

older | 1 | 2 | (Page 3) | 4 | newer

    0 0
  • 12/03/15--22:00: Ed Ruth - Riding and Pinning
  • 2014 U.S. World Team member Ed Ruth presents the top position techniques that helped him claim three NCAA titles. He covers more than 15 techniques, including crossface cradles, 2-on-1 roll through tilt, the Ruth Ride, The Ruth Cradle, Easton tilt and more. You'll also see how Ruth defends cradle and helf nelsons.

    29 minutes. 2014.


    0 0
  • 09/22/18--22:00: The Tiger Tilt
  • with Herb Stinson,
    former Aztec (NM) High School Head Coach;
    member of the National High School Athletic Coaches Association (NHSACA) Hall of Fame (2016);
    12 New Mexico High School State Champions, including 11 in a row (1990-2000);
    3x National High School Coach of the Year (1991, 1995, 2000);
    6x New Mexico A/3A State Coach of the Year; coach 65 individual State Champions and won 139 tournament championships; over 500 career wins

    Legendary wrestling coach Herb Stinson, member of the National High School Athletic Coaches Association Hall of Fame and three-time national coach of the year, walks you through a tilt system guaranteed to bring points to your wrestlers - no matter their skill level.

    With this four-point tilt system, you will be able to turn opponents from just about any position, including base, flat, short sit, standing and even when they par terre.

    Easy set-up, simple fundamental moves and tilts on drilling make this tilt a go-to for any wrestler in any situation.

    All proceeds from this video benefit the Aztec Wrestling Program Community Building Fund to build a new facility to meet the needs of the wrestling community ages 4-18.

    23 minutes. 2016.


    0 0

    with Mark Cody,
    Presbyterian College Director of Men's and Women's Wrestling;
    former Head Coach at University of Oklahoma and American University;
    2011 NWCA National Coach of the Year; 3x All-American

    Fundamental defense from the feet is a trademark of great wrestlers. In order to win at the highest level, your athletes must be solid on their feet, and especially at defending opponent's shots.

    Mark Cody's teams were known for their fundamentally sound defense and ability to score back points with their counter offense. In this video, he shows different defenses to the single leg and the high crotch. He emphasizes heavy hip pressure and shows ways to break a tight lock and finish the go-behind with a cradle or turn.

    Stance, Motion and Downblocks

    The most effective defense is always prevention. If your opponent cannot snap you down or get to your legs, he has no chance of scoring. Coach Cody demonstrates the proper stance and how to move in order to create angles to attack an opponent while keeping yourself in good position. You'll learn how to down block and sprawl, and how to recover from these movements to get yourself back in good position.

    Coach Cody shares individual and partner stance and motion drills that are excellent for reinforcing solid positioning skills. They have a unique emphasis on creating forward pressure to prevent the opponent from initiating their own attacks.

    Single Leg Defense

    Coach Cody teaches defensive techniques from several positions:

    • Low level - Various options depending if the opponent is in tight or extended; and how to score from a possible stalemate position
    • High level - See a couple of options and how one can set up the other

    When defending a single leg shot, Coach Cody emphasizes pressuring down on your opponent's head and applying hip pressure. You'll see how to apply constant hip pressure while attacking your opponents back ankle. He demonstrates how to score using a "high leg over leg under" technique, which puts the attacking wrestler in danger of going over to his back. Also, Coach Cody demonstrates locking through your opponents legs, which leads to cradle and turk opportunities.

    High Crotch Defense

    Coach Cody demonstrates leg in the air defense and a high crotch defense that is similar to the high single leg defense, except that the defensive wrestler squares their hips to negate the angle that the attacking wrestler has created. He pays special attention to defending against and countering the crackdown finish that has become so popular from the high crotch.

    Defending and Clearing Ties

    The Underhook and the 2-on-1 Russian tie are two positions from which many wrestlers will look to control the clock and set up their own offense. Here, Coach Cody shows several ways of safely clearing each tie-up without exposing yourself to attacks from the opposing wrestler.

    Re-Shot Techniques

    The re-shot is one of the best shots in the sport, and all elite wrestlers are good at it. Coach Cody demonstrates the basic theory of the re-shot and demonstrates how to use your opponent's motion to set up your own leg attack. Learn how to drill so that your opponent's shot becomes your set up.

    The defensive techniques taught in this video will give your wrestlers an advantage on the mat. Being able to score from a defensive position is often the difference between winning and losing a match. Solid technique is critical in wrestling and can overcome strength and athletic ability.

    "I can't think of a video that shows so many moves in an hour. Many of them are very unique so that makes this video valuable." - Customer Review

    64 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    WRD-05136A:

    with Mark Cody,
    Presbyterian College Director of Men's and Women's Wrestling;
    former Head Coach at University of Oklahoma and American University;
    2011 NWCA National Coach of the Year; 3x All-American

    Many wrestlers struggle with creating openings and finishing takedowns against quality opponents. Even the best high school wrestlers struggle when they reach the collegiate level and need to learn to use their whole body to control and attack their opponent, instead of just their arms.

    Mark Cody, one of the most experienced and highly regarded collegiate wrestling coaches, has developed a series that generates a ton of offense. His system stresses attacking with your body and not your arms, which helps athletes of all sizes to be effective. The series isn't challenging to learn and has a beauty in it that most finishes all come from the same set of skills.

    Coach Cody solves the issue of losing takedowns by sharing his "two hands on the leg" philosophy. He emphasizes constant forward motion, which helps wrestlers stay on the attack and close the gap so that they can take good shots. He teaches how to stay solid in attacks by keeping power in one place, which keeps the offensive wrestler from getting into a bad position. The techniques he demonstrates will eliminate many opportunities that opponents often have to create scramble situations.

    Arm Drag and Arm Drop Series

    The arm drag is a common set-up seen at all levels of wrestling, with wrestlers from youth levels up to Olympians using it with great success. Coach Cody teaches a unique finishing technique to the arm drag that will keep a wrestler from giving up their ankles and getting leg rolled. He also shows how to maintain pressure with the body in order to keep the opponent from getting to their belly

    Coach Cody shows his modification of the arm drag into a more controlled, methodical position: the arm-drop. He demonstrates a logical progression of attacks: single leg, ankle pick, and snap down. With every technique, Coach Cody emphasizes using the whole body to pressure and control the opponent, instead of relying on upper body strength.

    Every takedown is carefully addressed to minimize the risk of the opponent initiating a scramble, and follow-ups into pinning combinations and turns are investigated.

    Shrug Takedowns

    The shrug, or slide-by, is perhaps the most efficient takedown in wrestling. It requires minimal energy to finish and exposes the attacker to virtually no counter attacks. Despite this, it is a technique that few wrestlers are able to decipher, let alone master.

    The shrug series showed by Cody is perfect to use on an aggressive opponent. This series teaches wrestlers to have heavy hands and attack with their body and hips. He demonstrates the nuances of setting up the takedown, enabling wrestlers to treat it as more than just a reactive technique. Cody discusses a number of gripping varieties, and the differences of each, which allows wrestlers and coaches to figure out which method works best for their body.

    Takedown Finishes

    Every successful coach and wrestler knows the hardest part of scoring a takedown is not getting to the legs - it's finishing the takedown once you're there.

    Cody shows techniques to finish the double leg, the high crotch and both the high and low single legs; he shares highly effective, and sometimes non-conventional, methods that have been used with terrific success by his wrestlers to minimize scrambles and wasted energy.

    With this video you will learn how to stay in good position throughout your attack without wasting energy and leaving yourself open to scrambles and counters!

    67 minutes. 2017.



    WRD-05136B:

    with Mark Cody,
    Presbyterian College Director of Men's and Women's Wrestling;
    former Head Coach at University of Oklahoma and American University;
    2011 NWCA National Coach of the Year; 3x All-American

    Fundamental defense from the feet is a trademark of great wrestlers. In order to win at the highest level, your athletes must be solid on their feet, and especially at defending opponent's shots.

    Mark Cody's teams were known for their fundamentally sound defense and ability to score back points with their counter offense. In this video, he shows different defenses to the single leg and the high crotch. He emphasizes heavy hip pressure and shows ways to break a tight lock and finish the go-behind with a cradle or turn.

    Stance, Motion and Downblocks

    The most effective defense is always prevention. If your opponent cannot snap you down or get to your legs, he has no chance of scoring. Coach Cody demonstrates the proper stance and how to move in order to create angles to attack an opponent while keeping yourself in good position. You'll learn how to down block and sprawl, and how to recover from these movements to get yourself back in good position.

    Coach Cody shares individual and partner stance and motion drills that are excellent for reinforcing solid positioning skills. They have a unique emphasis on creating forward pressure to prevent the opponent from initiating their own attacks.

    Single Leg Defense

    Coach Cody teaches defensive techniques from several positions:

    • Low level - Various options depending if the opponent is in tight or extended; and how to score from a possible stalemate position
    • High level - See a couple of options and how one can set up the other

    When defending a single leg shot, Coach Cody emphasizes pressuring down on your opponent's head and applying hip pressure. You'll see how to apply constant hip pressure while attacking your opponents back ankle. He demonstrates how to score using a "high leg over leg under" technique, which puts the attacking wrestler in danger of going over to his back. Also, Coach Cody demonstrates locking through your opponents legs, which leads to cradle and turk opportunities.

    High Crotch Defense

    Coach Cody demonstrates leg in the air defense and a high crotch defense that is similar to the high single leg defense, except that the defensive wrestler squares their hips to negate the angle that the attacking wrestler has created. He pays special attention to defending against and countering the crackdown finish that has become so popular from the high crotch.

    Defending and Clearing Ties

    The Underhook and the 2-on-1 Russian tie are two positions from which many wrestlers will look to control the clock and set up their own offense. Here, Coach Cody shows several ways of safely clearing each tie-up without exposing yourself to attacks from the opposing wrestler.

    Re-Shot Techniques

    The re-shot is one of the best shots in the sport, and all elite wrestlers are good at it. Coach Cody demonstrates the basic theory of the re-shot and demonstrates how to use your opponent's motion to set up your own leg attack. Learn how to drill so that your opponent's shot becomes your set up.

    The defensive techniques taught in this video will give your wrestlers an advantage on the mat. Being able to score from a defensive position is often the difference between winning and losing a match. Solid technique is critical in wrestling and can overcome strength and athletic ability.

    "I can't think of a video that shows so many moves in an hour. Many of them are very unique so that makes this video valuable." - Customer Review

    64 minutes. 2017.




    0 0

    with Mark Cody,
    Presbyterian College Director of Men's and Women's Wrestling;
    former Head Coach at University of Oklahoma and American University;
    2011 NWCA National Coach of the Year; 3x All-American

    Many wrestlers struggle with creating openings and finishing takedowns against quality opponents. Even the best high school wrestlers struggle when they reach the collegiate level and need to learn to use their whole body to control and attack their opponent, instead of just their arms.

    Mark Cody, one of the most experienced and highly regarded collegiate wrestling coaches, has developed a series that generates a ton of offense. His system stresses attacking with your body and not your arms, which helps athletes of all sizes to be effective. The series isn't challenging to learn and has a beauty in it that most finishes all come from the same set of skills.

    Coach Cody solves the issue of losing takedowns by sharing his "two hands on the leg" philosophy. He emphasizes constant forward motion, which helps wrestlers stay on the attack and close the gap so that they can take good shots. He teaches how to stay solid in attacks by keeping power in one place, which keeps the offensive wrestler from getting into a bad position. The techniques he demonstrates will eliminate many opportunities that opponents often have to create scramble situations.

    Arm Drag and Arm Drop Series

    The arm drag is a common set-up seen at all levels of wrestling, with wrestlers from youth levels up to Olympians using it with great success. Coach Cody teaches a unique finishing technique to the arm drag that will keep a wrestler from giving up their ankles and getting leg rolled. He also shows how to maintain pressure with the body in order to keep the opponent from getting to their belly

    Coach Cody shows his modification of the arm drag into a more controlled, methodical position: the arm-drop. He demonstrates a logical progression of attacks: single leg, ankle pick, and snap down. With every technique, Coach Cody emphasizes using the whole body to pressure and control the opponent, instead of relying on upper body strength.

    Every takedown is carefully addressed to minimize the risk of the opponent initiating a scramble, and follow-ups into pinning combinations and turns are investigated.

    Shrug Takedowns

    The shrug, or slide-by, is perhaps the most efficient takedown in wrestling. It requires minimal energy to finish and exposes the attacker to virtually no counter attacks. Despite this, it is a technique that few wrestlers are able to decipher, let alone master.

    The shrug series showed by Cody is perfect to use on an aggressive opponent. This series teaches wrestlers to have heavy hands and attack with their body and hips. He demonstrates the nuances of setting up the takedown, enabling wrestlers to treat it as more than just a reactive technique. Cody discusses a number of gripping varieties, and the differences of each, which allows wrestlers and coaches to figure out which method works best for their body.

    Takedown Finishes

    Every successful coach and wrestler knows the hardest part of scoring a takedown is not getting to the legs - it's finishing the takedown once you're there.

    Cody shows techniques to finish the double leg, the high crotch and both the high and low single legs; he shares highly effective, and sometimes non-conventional, methods that have been used with terrific success by his wrestlers to minimize scrambles and wasted energy.

    With this video you will learn how to stay in good position throughout your attack without wasting energy and leaving yourself open to scrambles and counters!

    67 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Mark Perry,
    University of Illinois Associate Head Coach;
    2013 Amateur Wrestling News Division I Assistant Coach of the Year;
    2x NCAA Champion (4x All American) and 2005 NWCA Rookie of the Year at the University of Iowa;
    won the Gorrarian Trophy at the 2007 NCAA Tournament

    Mark Perry has been successful as both a coach and an athlete at all levels of wrestling. One of the reasons he's had great success is his attention to detail in finishing takedowns. Perry's ties to the Oklahoma State and Iowa wrestling programs have allowed for him to become one of the great technical minds in the sport. In this video, Perry provides insight as to why the ability to finish takedowns is what sets great wrestlers apart from good wrestlers.

    The key to scoring on your feet is the ability to finish an offensive attack on any opponent. Perry demonstrates high level finishes from a high crotch, crackdown, single leg, and low single leg, such as the lost art of running the pipe, Saitiev crackdown, and an Iranian. You'll also see variations to the finishes based on the type of opponent that a wrestler might encounter.

    High Crotch Finishes

    The high crotch has traditionally been taught with two finishes up high: the cut off and the lift. Coach Perry revisits these classic finishes and adds a new wrinkle to consistently create a strong angle and more powerful lift. Next, he shows how to incorporate running the pipe in with the high crotch to reset the angle if the opponent squares up, and how to use it to complement the other finishes. Finally, he shows a series of leg up finishes, which have started to grow in popularity at the collegiate level, but are poorly understood by many.

    Crackdown Finishes

    The crackdown is one of the most frustrating positions to be put in for an attacking wrestler because it's incredibly easy to get stuck in a stalemate. Perry was one of the most effective users of the crackdown defensively during his collegiate career, and he's able to bring an interesting perspective to the position on offense.

    Coach Perry demonstrates what to do if a wrestler's high crotch attempt ends on the mat in a crackdown position:

    • Swim - One of the most effective ways to finish in the crackdown position. The swim puts a wrestler in a situation to cradle and pin their opponent.
    • Arm Trap to Kick Flip - Used when an opponent defends with a chest lock or a crotch lift and allows a wrestler to put their opponent in danger.
    • Pushback - Used when a wrestler is unable to get arm control and allows for a wrestler to secure a takedown with a table top or Saitiev crackdown finish.

    Single Leg Finishes

    Perry shows several twists on traditional finishes to the single leg, coming out the backdoor, and low single leg. He emphasizes locking out the leg and the foot, completely eliminating the advantages that flexible and athletic opponents may have. He also shows a key detail to attacking the low single that will change your approach to penetration and significantly improve your efficiency with the attack. Finally, he shows a simple and effective counter to the funk cradle, a move for which he has received great recognition.

    Opponents will force you into various positions and you must learn how to finish from all positions and from both sides. Perry will give you the foundation for building those skills. With this video, you'll learn to wrestle from all positions.

    101 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Chris Perry,
    Oklahoma State University Assistant Coach;
    2x NCAA Champion and 3x All-American for Oklahoma State University;
    2014 University World Silver Medalist; 2009 Junior Hodge Trophy winner

    The most important aspect of wrestling in the neutral position is hand fighting - controlling the opponent, setting up offense, and wearing them down. However, this is often considered the most challenging aspect of wrestling to teach - wrestlers are often shown discrete tie-ups, without an idea of how to transition between them and keep their opponent off-balance.

    In this video, two-time NCAA National Champion Chris Perry teaches a systematic approach to transitioning between tie-ups and leg attacks. You'll learn offensive moves from three common and important ties ups:

    • Inside tie and wrist control
    • Head ties
    • Elbow control

    Perry thoroughly explains the concepts, tricks and objectives of each tie up and how to set up shots and neutralize your opponent's offense, giving you the advantage of knowing that you can attack, while your opponent's options are limited.

    After explaining each tie up, Perry goes on to show the transitions from the tie ups, to the leg attacks, focusing heavily on the high crotch and single leg.

    Inside Tie, Wrist Control and Take DownsPerry begins by showing how a wrestler should approach the opponent so he/she doesn't extend themself and get taken down. With an inside tie, you will learn a nifty trick with your thumb that will hinder your opponent from being able to shoot.

    After getting an inside tie along with wrist control, you'll learn how to successfully use it to attack a high crotch. Perry methodically explains how to open a "window" with an inside tie to get to a high crotch, and from there, how to properly position your body and finish the take down.

    Perry also shows how to attack a single leg from this tie up. Learn why the single leg is actually easier, as often at times your attack hand is the closest hand to the leg. When attacking the single leg, Perry demonstrates the importance of ensuring your arm pit and attack hand are both underneath the leg, which prevents your opponent from being able to defend the single leg. You'll see two common finishes from the single leg, giving you the option to:

    • Use your shoulder to turn into the leg to finish it on the mat
    • Bring the leg up to your feet and finish it from there

    How to Clear Head Ties and Get to Leg Attacks

    Head ties are one of the most common and annoying tie ups in wrestling. In this section, you'll learn why you shouldn't go ear-to-ear when in a collar tie unless you're trying to stall or catch your breath. However, as all wrestlers know, being ear-to-ear with your opponent happens all the time and this can be annoying when you're offensive minded and looking to score.

    • You will learn how to get from being jammed up ear-to-ear in a collar tie, to a more offensive position where you are head-to-head and have the space to attack the single leg.
    • If you prefer the high crotch, Perry shows you how to set this up from a collar tie and how to open the "window," allowing you to successfully get to the leg and finish the take down.
    • If attacking from collar ties aren't your thing, Perry also shows you the option of using your hand to push your opponent's face away, to either create separation or transition into another tie up which you find favorable.

    Elbow Control

    Elbow control is a tie up Oklahoma State is known for. Perry begins by expelling the common misconceptions about elbow control and shows you how to hold onto the elbow properly, so you nullify your opponent's inside tie and take away any offensive opportunities.

    You'll learn how elbow control can be used as a control tie to bully your opponent around the mat, and how to recognize the best time to shoot off elbow control. From elbow control, you'll learn how to segue into the main attacks from the position: the inside reach single, the duck-under, and the high crotch.

    Elbow Pass

    If you find yourself stuck ear-to-ear in your opponent's head tie, and can't roll your head underneath theirs to create space or push their head away, Perry shows you how to execute an elbow pass off elbow control. When executing an elbow pass, you can often go to an inside tie and execute your favorite take downs from there. He explains why shooting off an elbow pass is dependent on how your opponent reacts, and shows attacks to the most common reaction of your opponent squaring up. From there, you have the option to go for a:

    • High crotch
    • Double leg
    • Low single leg

    Finishing Leg Attacks

    As important as hand fighting, set-ups and penetration are to wrestling, they are useless without strong finishes on takedowns. Perry breaks down the fundamentals of positioning to finish a single leg and a high crotch. He emphasizes how to keep the hips under a wrestler, and maintain a strong angle to minimize the use of strength and energy to finish the position.

    Wrestling on the feet is a tough skill to learn. Perry does an amazing job showing how these set-ups transition a bad shot into a great attack series.

    54 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    WRD-05245A:

    with Steve Costanzo,
    St. Cloud State University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA DII National Champions - third title in four years, including back-to-back National Championships (2016-17);
    2018 NWCA DII National Duals Champions;
    2016 NCAA DII Coach of the Year;
    2018 Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Champions - winners of seven straight conference titles (2012-18) and 11 overall; 5x NSIC Coach of the Year; former Dana College Head Coach - 2016 NAIA National Champions

    Steve Costanzo has turned St. Cloud State into a NCAA D-II wrestling powerhouse. Under Coach Costanzo, the Huskies have won back-to-back NCAA Division II titles (2016-17). Through the 2017 season, St. Cloud has won six straight Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Championships (and 10 overall under Costanzo) and have not lost a conference dual meet since 2011. Coach Costanzo, two-time National D-II Coach of the Year, has coached seven National Champions and 76 All-Americans. He also served as head coach at Dana College, where he led his squad to the 2006 NAIA National Title and was awarded the NAIA Coach of the Year.

    Many wrestlers at all levels are successful at getting to the legs, but struggle with finishing, either wasting energy being stalemated, or being scored on with counter offense. Frequently, these wrestlers have a finish or two they feel comfortable with, but don't have a systematic approach to dealing with the variety of defenses that opponents can use against them.

    Two-time National Coach of the Year Steve Constanzo shows a complete system for finishing the single leg attack. Along with his assistant, Division II All-American Jay Hildreth, Costanzo demonstrates the fundamental positioning to finish the single leg and high crotch off your opponent's reaction on your feet and on the mat. They also demonstrate how to finish from various problem positions that wrestlers may encounter from their takedown attempts.

    Single Leg Finishes (Head on the Inside)

  • The single leg is the most common and high-percentage finish at every level of wrestling, from the youth level to the World Championships and Olympics. Many athletes, however, struggle with finishing. Constanzo delves into his complete system of finishing from the feet, on the mat, and splitting the legs.

    Learn the "nuts and bolts" of the single leg by understanding the proper positioning. Costanzo demonstrates four main finishes from your feet:

  • Leg Sweep - A "go to" front side trip to secure a takedown.
  • Knee Smash to Backside Double - A great transition if you are unable to execute a leg sweep.
  • Uppercut to Trip - Great option to finish a takedown against flexible opponents.
  • Barzegar Technique - An explosive way to finish the single quickly, get your opponent off balance, and take them straight to their back.
  • Train your wrestlers to use their defensive position as an advantage to finish their takedown. You'll learn different single leg finishes from the mat. Coach Costanzo breaks down each technique, emphasizing key points so that the techniques are easy to learn.

    • Tug of War Position: Great way to defeat an opponent's whizzer attempt and to finish a takedown.
    • Knee Slide: Beat an opponent with heavy hips by getting underneath them into a better position.

    You'll also learn a variety of ways to look for falls after finishing the takedowns, such as a turk.

    Beating the Key Lock or Shin Whizzer

    One position that frustrates even the most experience athletes is the key lock, shin whizzer or hip lock position, as it isolates the leg and prevents the other wrestler from getting an angle to finish the single leg. Constanzo shows two distinct finishes to finish the single leg on the mat. These techniques are a must for wrestlers who are getting stuck in this position!

    High Crotch Finishes (Head on the Outside)

    Coach Jay Hildreth shows a variety of adjustment to improve your finishing percentage with the two most common high crotch finishes: the switch-off to a double leg and the dump, which is a great way to finish a high crotch if your opponent blocks your elbow to prevent you from switching off to a double leg finish.

    Beating the Crackdown Position

    Once wrestlers have established themselves as a threat in these positions, opponents will look to immediately enter the crackdown against them. From here, Hildreth shows five finishes, depending on the exact position the wrestlers land in, including two that will end in back points.

    • Create Space to a Body Turk: Great way to pick up a fall when wrestlers get stuck between opponent's legs.
    • Create Space to a Backside Double: Another way to score from between the opponent's legs.
    • Circle into Him: Ideal finish for when wrestlers are outside the opponent's legs in a crackdown situation.
    • Swim and Catch His Head: Allows for a transition from a crackdown to a cradle.
    • Elbow Roll: Score big points when the opponent locks around your body by finishing in a Peterson Roll or Turk.

    By learning a complete system of finishing leg attacks, wrestlers will always be in a position to score and control the match. Learn some great moves from Coach Constanzo today!

    68 minutes. 2017.



    WRD-05245B:

    with Steve Costanzo,
    St. Cloud State University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA DII National Champions - third title in four years, including back-to-back National Championships (2016-17);
    2018 NWCA DII National Duals Champions;
    2016 NCAA DII Coach of the Year;
    2018 Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Champions - winners of seven straight conference titles (2012-18) and 11 overall; 5x NSIC Coach of the Year; former Dana College Head Coach - 2016 NAIA National Champions

    featuring Austin Goergen,
    4x All-American at St. Cloud St.;
    named the NCAA Division II's Most Dominant Wrestler for 2017;
    holds the team record for most falls in a career (71) and season (20)

    Steve Costanzo has turned St. Cloud State into a NCAA D-II wrestling powerhouse. Under Coach Costanzo, the Huskies have won back-to-back NCAA Division II titles (2016-17). Through the 2017 season, St. Cloud has won six straight Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Championships (and 10 overall under Costanzo) and have not lost a conference dual meet since 2011. Coach Costanzo, two-time National D-II Coach of the Year, has coached seven National Champions and 76 All-Americans. He also served as head coach at Dana College, where he led his squad to the 2006 NAIA National Title and was awarded the NAIA Coach of the Year.

    Steve Costanza, with help from four-time All-American Austin Goergen, shows you how to score from the mat (and the neutral position) using his Leg Turk series. Along with the details of successfully executing the Turks, you'll see the set-ups, common mistakes, and how to score the pin out of these Turks. No secret is spared in covering how to get the Turk and your opponent to their back!

    Bent Leg Turk

    The Bent Leg Turk is a simple, but highly effective version of the Turk which does not involve scissoring your opponent's leg. Coach Goergen demonstrates the Turk from the set-up, through the takedown to the finish, highlighting several key details that make sure it stays functional.

    Costanzo demonstrates how to secure the fall after scoring the maximum allotment of near fall points, followed by the common mistakes made with the technique and how to rectify these mistakes.

    Split Leg Turk

    The Split Leg Turk is the more traditional Turk that includes a scissors of the opponent's "top" leg. It's one of the most effective scoring techniques from the top position that can crush your opponent's spirit due to its scoring power. Costanzo demonstrates how to get into the hold from a variety of positions, and how to finish scoring back points and pins. You'll also see how to set up and hit the Split Leg Turk from leg attacks in single leg, double leg, and high-crotch positions.

    Also demonstrated are the Trapped Leg Turk, which is a variation of the Turk that involves a figure four of your opponents leg, and the High Thigh Turk. You'll learn the main points of each, including how to finish the hold with a fall and how to correct the common mistakes related to each Turk.

    Body Turk

    The crackdown position is difficult for many wrestlers. Assistant Coach Jay Hildreth demonstrates how to use a Body Turk as a counter to opponent defense, primarily the crackdown position. He teaches two ways to secure the Body Turk, and technique to score back points from it.

    Breakdown Drills for the Turk Series

    Coach Costanzo shows three drills that he has his wrestlers do to master the Turk series. The first drill helps wrestlers develop good hip position while using the Turk and works on keeping the opponent on the mat. The last two drills are sparring drills that have the wrestlers go over each Turk series. During the drill sessions, Costanzo talks through the holds and focuses attention on key details as the wrestlers drill on the holds.

    This is a great video for an intermediate or advanced wrestler that wants to become tough on top from a comfortable position of already having a leg in. Not only are you shown how to get the turn in, you are shown how to get to it from the legs and various breakdowns and what to do when your opponent tries to counter the turn. This is a devastating series from the top position and you will benefit greatly from learning the finer points of a Leg Turk!

    43 minutes. 2017.




    0 0

    with Steve Costanzo,
    St. Cloud State University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA DII National Champions - third title in four years, including back-to-back National Championships (2016-17);
    2018 NWCA DII National Duals Champions;
    2016 NCAA DII Coach of the Year;
    2018 Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Champions - winners of seven straight conference titles (2012-18) and 11 overall; 5x NSIC Coach of the Year; former Dana College Head Coach - 2016 NAIA National Champions

    Steve Costanzo has turned St. Cloud State into a NCAA D-II wrestling powerhouse. Under Coach Costanzo, the Huskies have won back-to-back NCAA Division II titles (2016-17). Through the 2017 season, St. Cloud has won six straight Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Championships (and 10 overall under Costanzo) and have not lost a conference dual meet since 2011. Coach Costanzo, two-time National D-II Coach of the Year, has coached seven National Champions and 76 All-Americans. He also served as head coach at Dana College, where he led his squad to the 2006 NAIA National Title and was awarded the NAIA Coach of the Year.

    Many wrestlers at all levels are successful at getting to the legs, but struggle with finishing, either wasting energy being stalemated, or being scored on with counter offense. Frequently, these wrestlers have a finish or two they feel comfortable with, but don't have a systematic approach to dealing with the variety of defenses that opponents can use against them.

    Two-time National Coach of the Year Steve Constanzo shows a complete system for finishing the single leg attack. Along with his assistant, Division II All-American Jay Hildreth, Costanzo demonstrates the fundamental positioning to finish the single leg and high crotch off your opponent's reaction on your feet and on the mat. They also demonstrate how to finish from various problem positions that wrestlers may encounter from their takedown attempts.

    Single Leg Finishes (Head on the Inside)

  • The single leg is the most common and high-percentage finish at every level of wrestling, from the youth level to the World Championships and Olympics. Many athletes, however, struggle with finishing. Constanzo delves into his complete system of finishing from the feet, on the mat, and splitting the legs.

    Learn the "nuts and bolts" of the single leg by understanding the proper positioning. Costanzo demonstrates four main finishes from your feet:

  • Leg Sweep - A "go to" front side trip to secure a takedown.
  • Knee Smash to Backside Double - A great transition if you are unable to execute a leg sweep.
  • Uppercut to Trip - Great option to finish a takedown against flexible opponents.
  • Barzegar Technique - An explosive way to finish the single quickly, get your opponent off balance, and take them straight to their back.
  • Train your wrestlers to use their defensive position as an advantage to finish their takedown. You'll learn different single leg finishes from the mat. Coach Costanzo breaks down each technique, emphasizing key points so that the techniques are easy to learn.

    • Tug of War Position: Great way to defeat an opponent's whizzer attempt and to finish a takedown.
    • Knee Slide: Beat an opponent with heavy hips by getting underneath them into a better position.

    You'll also learn a variety of ways to look for falls after finishing the takedowns, such as a turk.

    Beating the Key Lock or Shin Whizzer

    One position that frustrates even the most experience athletes is the key lock, shin whizzer or hip lock position, as it isolates the leg and prevents the other wrestler from getting an angle to finish the single leg. Constanzo shows two distinct finishes to finish the single leg on the mat. These techniques are a must for wrestlers who are getting stuck in this position!

    High Crotch Finishes (Head on the Outside)

    Coach Jay Hildreth shows a variety of adjustment to improve your finishing percentage with the two most common high crotch finishes: the switch-off to a double leg and the dump, which is a great way to finish a high crotch if your opponent blocks your elbow to prevent you from switching off to a double leg finish.

    Beating the Crackdown Position

    Once wrestlers have established themselves as a threat in these positions, opponents will look to immediately enter the crackdown against them. From here, Hildreth shows five finishes, depending on the exact position the wrestlers land in, including two that will end in back points.

    • Create Space to a Body Turk: Great way to pick up a fall when wrestlers get stuck between opponent's legs.
    • Create Space to a Backside Double: Another way to score from between the opponent's legs.
    • Circle into Him: Ideal finish for when wrestlers are outside the opponent's legs in a crackdown situation.
    • Swim and Catch His Head: Allows for a transition from a crackdown to a cradle.
    • Elbow Roll: Score big points when the opponent locks around your body by finishing in a Peterson Roll or Turk.

    By learning a complete system of finishing leg attacks, wrestlers will always be in a position to score and control the match. Learn some great moves from Coach Constanzo today!

    68 minutes. 2017.


    0 0
  • 09/22/18--22:00: Bent Leg Turk Series
  • with Steve Costanzo,
    St. Cloud State University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA DII National Champions - third title in four years, including back-to-back National Championships (2016-17);
    2018 NWCA DII National Duals Champions;
    2016 NCAA DII Coach of the Year;
    2018 Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Champions - winners of seven straight conference titles (2012-18) and 11 overall; 5x NSIC Coach of the Year; former Dana College Head Coach - 2016 NAIA National Champions

    featuring Austin Goergen,
    4x All-American at St. Cloud St.;
    named the NCAA Division II's Most Dominant Wrestler for 2017;
    holds the team record for most falls in a career (71) and season (20)

    Steve Costanzo has turned St. Cloud State into a NCAA D-II wrestling powerhouse. Under Coach Costanzo, the Huskies have won back-to-back NCAA Division II titles (2016-17). Through the 2017 season, St. Cloud has won six straight Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Championships (and 10 overall under Costanzo) and have not lost a conference dual meet since 2011. Coach Costanzo, two-time National D-II Coach of the Year, has coached seven National Champions and 76 All-Americans. He also served as head coach at Dana College, where he led his squad to the 2006 NAIA National Title and was awarded the NAIA Coach of the Year.

    Steve Costanza, with help from four-time All-American Austin Goergen, shows you how to score from the mat (and the neutral position) using his Leg Turk series. Along with the details of successfully executing the Turks, you'll see the set-ups, common mistakes, and how to score the pin out of these Turks. No secret is spared in covering how to get the Turk and your opponent to their back!

    Bent Leg Turk

    The Bent Leg Turk is a simple, but highly effective version of the Turk which does not involve scissoring your opponent's leg. Coach Goergen demonstrates the Turk from the set-up, through the takedown to the finish, highlighting several key details that make sure it stays functional.

    Costanzo demonstrates how to secure the fall after scoring the maximum allotment of near fall points, followed by the common mistakes made with the technique and how to rectify these mistakes.

    Split Leg Turk

    The Split Leg Turk is the more traditional Turk that includes a scissors of the opponent's "top" leg. It's one of the most effective scoring techniques from the top position that can crush your opponent's spirit due to its scoring power. Costanzo demonstrates how to get into the hold from a variety of positions, and how to finish scoring back points and pins. You'll also see how to set up and hit the Split Leg Turk from leg attacks in single leg, double leg, and high-crotch positions.

    Also demonstrated are the Trapped Leg Turk, which is a variation of the Turk that involves a figure four of your opponents leg, and the High Thigh Turk. You'll learn the main points of each, including how to finish the hold with a fall and how to correct the common mistakes related to each Turk.

    Body Turk

    The crackdown position is difficult for many wrestlers. Assistant Coach Jay Hildreth demonstrates how to use a Body Turk as a counter to opponent defense, primarily the crackdown position. He teaches two ways to secure the Body Turk, and technique to score back points from it.

    Breakdown Drills for the Turk Series

    Coach Costanzo shows three drills that he has his wrestlers do to master the Turk series. The first drill helps wrestlers develop good hip position while using the Turk and works on keeping the opponent on the mat. The last two drills are sparring drills that have the wrestlers go over each Turk series. During the drill sessions, Costanzo talks through the holds and focuses attention on key details as the wrestlers drill on the holds.

    This is a great video for an intermediate or advanced wrestler that wants to become tough on top from a comfortable position of already having a leg in. Not only are you shown how to get the turn in, you are shown how to get to it from the legs and various breakdowns and what to do when your opponent tries to counter the turn. This is a devastating series from the top position and you will benefit greatly from learning the finer points of a Leg Turk!

    43 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    WRD-05253A:

    with Chris Bono,
    University of Wisconsin Head Coach;
    former South Dakota State University Head Coach;
    2016 Big 12 Coach of the Year;
    2002 NWCA Assistant Coach of the Year;
    3x U.S. Freestyle World Team Member;
    3x All American and 1996 NCAA Champion at Iowa State University

    Have you ever had a wrestler in on a single leg and couldn't finish? How about giving up on a return to the mat, which resulted in a stall call or giving up a point? Now's the time for your wrestlers to win those positions! Matches can be won or lost by just one point, and this video will help your team be on the winning side of those matches.

    In this video, Chris Bono brings his national and international experience together to help you develop your wrestlers in these must-win positions. He shows you 10 must-win positions from the neutral position and the techniques to master these positions to become champions. The techniques and drills in this video will ensure your wrestlers compete at a high level once mastered.

    Finish 100% of the time when getting to a leg and getting it in the air.

    Your wrestlers must be able to finish when they get to the opponent's leg. Why would you want to work hard for 5 or 6 minutes to get to your opponent's leg once, then not be able to finish? Bono shows the proper technique in securing the single leg, and three ways to finish a single leg depending on how your opponent reacts. He also demonstrates how to score from a single when your opponent is trying to get off the mat or use the edge.

    Finish when in on a high crotch.

    Win the high-crotch crackdown position every time! Bono demonstrates small details to help your wrestlers score from four different high crotch positions that they'll end up in with regularity. Develop the skills needed to beat the wrestler who likes to sit the corner or crotch lift.

    Additionally, you'll get a knee slide drill that is essential for the high crotch.

    Win when in the dominant position from a standing front headlock.

    The front headlock is one of the most common positions in wrestling and one of the most common stalemated positions. Bono emphasizes proper head and hand position with this technique, showing how to control your opponent in order to get to their leg with a jab step.

    Beat your opponent's control ties.

    Coach Bono shows how to clear a two-on one and an underhook. He not only shows how to clear these ties, but how to transition directly into a tilt or capture the wrist.

    Win the rear standing position.

    Master the art of getting your opponent off his feet. Bono teaches ways to return the wrestler back to the mat that don't involve a lot of muscle to get the job done. He also shows how to get back points on the return.

    Coach Bono ends the video showing easy techniques to counter the single leg and body locks.

    This video addresses so many positions that tend to result in stalemates, conceding, or going out of bounds. Matches can be won or lost by just one point; this video will help your team be on the winning side of those matches!

    57 minutes. 2017.



    WRD-05253B:

    with Chris Bono,
    University of Wisconsin Head Coach;
    former South Dakota State University Head Coach;
    2016 Big 12 Coach of the Year;
    2002 NWCA Assistant Coach of the Year;
    3x U.S. Freestyle World Team Member;
    3x All American and 1996 NCAA Champion at Iowa State University

    Wrestlers miss or give up too many points in positions they can win. This video is a must for coaches tired of seeing their wrestlers leave points on the mat.

    Chris Bono walks through 10 must-win positions, focusing mainly on defensive positions that you must win. He breaks down the moves and covers every step in detail, adding drills along the way to master the positions. These are positions that are common problems for wrestlers.

    Crackdown Position and Beating a Leg Pass

    The crackdown is one of the most technical positions in wrestling, so learning how to win this position both offensively and defensively is essential. Coach Bono shows how to bump your opponent and get your leg back.

    A leg pass off a low single is rapidly becoming fundamental technique in wrestling. Learning the counter to counter game is now must-know material. Bono gives you a basic counter and shows how to use a back hook to complete the takedown.

    Single Leg Sprawl Counter and Returning to the Mat

    Coach Bono demonstrates three different finishes when your opponent sprawls. One of these finishes leads to back points from a Navy Ride, a solid, rarely seen move.

    If your wrestlers are tired of getting to their feet just to get returned, then learn how to land "like a cat" on all fours and knee slide in order to explode back to your feet and gain the advantage.

    Leg Defense and Defeating a Shin Whizzer

    The next two positions that Bono discuses are the shin whizzer defense and leg defense. Both of these positions can be difficult to defend. He shows two ways to defend the shin whizzer and four different ways to defend legs. Develop the skills to get the defensive pin or to get the escape.

    Win the Front Headlock

    The front headlock is a staple of Coach Bono's program. He demonstrates how he gets opponents out of position and how to score from the front headlock. See how to win this position from both top and bottom:

    • Master control with the chin and armpit to keep your opponent down and score on top.
    • Learn to stay strong on the bottom to win this position, whether your opponent locks hands or not.

    Coach Bono covers many common positions that wrestlers struggle with and shows how to rectify these problems. This is a great video to help your team get to the next level!

    53 minutes. 2017.




    0 0

    with Chris Bono,
    University of Wisconsin Head Coach;
    former South Dakota State University Head Coach;
    2016 Big 12 Coach of the Year;
    2002 NWCA Assistant Coach of the Year;
    3x U.S. Freestyle World Team Member;
    3x All American and 1996 NCAA Champion at Iowa State University

    Wrestlers miss or give up too many points in positions they can win. This video is a must for coaches tired of seeing their wrestlers leave points on the mat.

    Chris Bono walks through 10 must-win positions, focusing mainly on defensive positions that you must win. He breaks down the moves and covers every step in detail, adding drills along the way to master the positions. These are positions that are common problems for wrestlers.

    Crackdown Position and Beating a Leg Pass

    The crackdown is one of the most technical positions in wrestling, so learning how to win this position both offensively and defensively is essential. Coach Bono shows how to bump your opponent and get your leg back.

    A leg pass off a low single is rapidly becoming fundamental technique in wrestling. Learning the counter to counter game is now must-know material. Bono gives you a basic counter and shows how to use a back hook to complete the takedown.

    Single Leg Sprawl Counter and Returning to the Mat

    Coach Bono demonstrates three different finishes when your opponent sprawls. One of these finishes leads to back points from a Navy Ride, a solid, rarely seen move.

    If your wrestlers are tired of getting to their feet just to get returned, then learn how to land "like a cat" on all fours and knee slide in order to explode back to your feet and gain the advantage.

    Leg Defense and Defeating a Shin Whizzer

    The next two positions that Bono discuses are the shin whizzer defense and leg defense. Both of these positions can be difficult to defend. He shows two ways to defend the shin whizzer and four different ways to defend legs. Develop the skills to get the defensive pin or to get the escape.

    Win the Front Headlock

    The front headlock is a staple of Coach Bono's program. He demonstrates how he gets opponents out of position and how to score from the front headlock. See how to win this position from both top and bottom:

    • Master control with the chin and armpit to keep your opponent down and score on top.
    • Learn to stay strong on the bottom to win this position, whether your opponent locks hands or not.

    Coach Bono covers many common positions that wrestlers struggle with and shows how to rectify these problems. This is a great video to help your team get to the next level!

    53 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Chris Bono,
    University of Wisconsin Head Coach;
    former South Dakota State University Head Coach;
    2016 Big 12 Coach of the Year;
    2002 NWCA Assistant Coach of the Year;
    3x U.S. Freestyle World Team Member;
    3x All American and 1996 NCAA Champion at Iowa State University

    Have you ever had a wrestler in on a single leg and couldn't finish? How about giving up on a return to the mat, which resulted in a stall call or giving up a point? Now's the time for your wrestlers to win those positions! Matches can be won or lost by just one point, and this video will help your team be on the winning side of those matches.

    In this video, Chris Bono brings his national and international experience together to help you develop your wrestlers in these must-win positions. He shows you 10 must-win positions from the neutral position and the techniques to master these positions to become champions. The techniques and drills in this video will ensure your wrestlers compete at a high level once mastered.

    Finish 100% of the time when getting to a leg and getting it in the air.

    Your wrestlers must be able to finish when they get to the opponent's leg. Why would you want to work hard for 5 or 6 minutes to get to your opponent's leg once, then not be able to finish? Bono shows the proper technique in securing the single leg, and three ways to finish a single leg depending on how your opponent reacts. He also demonstrates how to score from a single when your opponent is trying to get off the mat or use the edge.

    Finish when in on a high crotch.

    Win the high-crotch crackdown position every time! Bono demonstrates small details to help your wrestlers score from four different high crotch positions that they'll end up in with regularity. Develop the skills needed to beat the wrestler who likes to sit the corner or crotch lift.

    Additionally, you'll get a knee slide drill that is essential for the high crotch.

    Win when in the dominant position from a standing front headlock.

    The front headlock is one of the most common positions in wrestling and one of the most common stalemated positions. Bono emphasizes proper head and hand position with this technique, showing how to control your opponent in order to get to their leg with a jab step.

    Beat your opponent's control ties.

    Coach Bono shows how to clear a two-on one and an underhook. He not only shows how to clear these ties, but how to transition directly into a tilt or capture the wrist.

    Win the rear standing position.

    Master the art of getting your opponent off his feet. Bono teaches ways to return the wrestler back to the mat that don't involve a lot of muscle to get the job done. He also shows how to get back points on the return.

    Coach Bono ends the video showing easy techniques to counter the single leg and body locks.

    This video addresses so many positions that tend to result in stalemates, conceding, or going out of bounds. Matches can be won or lost by just one point; this video will help your team be on the winning side of those matches!

    57 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Steve Costanzo,
    St. Cloud State University Head Coach;
    2018 NCAA DII National Champions - third title in four years, including back-to-back National Championships (2016-17);
    2018 NWCA DII National Duals Champions;
    2016 NCAA DII Coach of the Year;
    2018 Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference Champions - winners of seven straight conference titles (2012-18) and 11 overall; 5x NSIC Coach of the Year; former Dana College Head Coach - 2016 NAIA National Champions

    Practice is where the most development happens in your wrestlers. As a coach, it's important to understand how to structure your practices throughout the season in a way that helps your athletes peak at the right time, so they can maximize their success at the end of the year during regional and conference tournaments.

    A distinguishing characteristic of the St Cloud Huskies' practice sessions is the simple, effective coaching style of Steve Costanzo. You will see that he encourages his athletes to stick to high-percentage moves throughout their training; moves that you will be able to observe and apply to your own training or coaching.

    Phase 1: Pre-Season (Disc 1 & 2)

    Beginning mid-October through mid-December, Coach Costanzo and his staff introduce their training system to wrestlers and focus primarily on building core technique and integrating those skills during longer, intense live wrestling sessions. Practices start with a dynamic warm up consisting of a combination of calisthenics, band exercise and wrestling drills.

    During the first practice, Coach Costanzo and his staff review the bent leg turk series and cradle series, while also illustrating how to build up to intense live wrestling sessions through stance and motion drills and 80/50 movement drills. The 80/50 drill is used to develop confidence in a wrestler's takedowns and hand fighting skills. It teaches wrestlers to get to an angle so they can effectively attack the legs. It also teaches wrestlers how to transition from hand fighting to leg attacks.

    In the second practice, Coach Costanzo walks us through a 90-minute pre-season wrestling practice that's a little unconventional because live wrestling is done in the first half of practice and the technical side of things is focused on at the end. Match length and live go's can last anywhere from 15 minutes to 45 minutes. Costanzo explains that he gets the team to focus on a grinding type of training during phase one, typically lasting no more than 90 minutes.

    Drills focus on specific wrestling skills, such as the bull ride drill, to work on wrestlers' riding skills and the Abas roll and scrambling drill to work on leg passes and the ability to wrestle through all types of positions and scenarios.

    The last half of practice focuses on live situational wrestling and learning a cradle series. Assistant coach Brady Wilson shows the Huskie approach to breaking someone down, and how he splits the back into three parts. First, Wilson shows how to use this knowledge to successfully break the bottom man down, so the top wrestler can successfully start their cradle series. From there, Wilson goes into detail on how to execute the inside and outside cradle, as well as the situations in which a cradle presents itself.

    Phase 2: Mid-Season (Disc 3)

    From mid-December through the end of January, Costanzo shows how to focus on more chain wrestling through key drills, individual coaching, and shorter live wrestling sessions. With most of the team's core technique established at this time, the main focus of the practice is hard situational drilling to enhance technique that was developed during the first phase and live wrestling to help prepare the wrestlers for competition. Costanzo shows how to reinforce solid positions through key drills such as Position Matches, the Maintain Position Drill, and actively sparring through awkward positions.

    Phase 3: Late-Season

    From the beginning of February through the end of the season, Coach Costanzo shows how cutting practice times shorter and becoming more efficient with overall time on the mat can help your wrestlers peak at tournament time. With more intense practices that focus on constant drilling and short, situational wrestling sessions, Coach Costanzo reveals how you can get your whole team, both starters and non-starters, to peak at the end of the season. During this session, the coaching staff shows how to run a short, highly-intense practice with drills that promote fast reaction time and explosiveness, but allow wrestlers to drill at a high pace on individualized technique.

    Learn how to master the practice room, develop your wrestlers throughout the season, and get your team prepared to wrestle their best when it counts - at the end of the year! Use this video to create the ideal three phase training system for your team, so they can peak when it matters the most!

    387 minutes (4 DVDs). 2017.

    All Access videos are designed to allow viewers from all over the world to see how successful coaches run their practices in a "live" practice setting. All Access videos allow viewers to see the practices un-edited and in real-time. You will see how top coaches run their drills, interact with their team and staff, how they motivate their team, the cue words they use, the atmosphere of the practice and how practices are structured from day to day. Many coaches visit successful colleges and high schools to watch practice. But if you live out of state or out of the country, visiting another coach's gym can be costly. That's why we created the All Access Practice Series of videos -- to bring the practices to you!


    0 0

    with Jon Reader,
    University of Wisconsin Assistant Coach;
    former South Dakota State Assistant Coach;
    2x U.S. Freestyle World Team Member;
    2011 NCAA National Champion and 3x All-American at Iowa State University.

    Whether on purpose or accident, wrestlers will find themselves in an underhook position at some point. They need to know how to finish once they have the underhook.

    Jon Reader has been successful at all levels of wrestling. One of the reasons for his success has been due to his ability to use an underhook to open up scoring situations. In this video, Reader shows how he gets to the underhook from distance and from various ties.

    The key to scoring on your feet is to create angles and control your opponent. Reader demonstrates techniques to secure an underhook and open the door for offensive attacks, such as a head inside single and high crotch. He provides insight from the collegiate and international wrestling scene on how the ability to get to your underhook can make the difference in winning or losing the match.

    Additionally, Reader demonstrates the fundamentals needed to secure and open opportunities to score from the front headlock. He shows why this position is a major way to score on the international stage of wrestling.

    Getting to the Underhook

    Learn how a good stance and positioning is the gateway to getting into your underhooks. Reader teaches the hand and footwork in order to dig the underhook. He stresses the details on how the hand and footwork must be together in order to gain the advantage. Reader demonstrates three simple and effective ways to get into your underhooks:

    • Head Club - A good initial setup for a underhook that will allow an opening to dig an underhook.
    • Wrist Roll - Great way to get into a underhook off of your opponent's collar tie.
    • Inside Elbow Post - A great way to create an opening if you are unable to set your underhook up with a wrist roll.

    Once the underhook is in, Reader demonstrates ways to move your opponent. This is vital as it helps create angles for the best scoring opportunities.

    Head Inside Single from Underhook

    Learn how to create an angle and attack with a head inside single (Knee Pull). Reader discusses hand and head position when attacking the leg that keeps you in correct position in order to finish the shot. You'll learn how to get to this position regardless of your opponent's position. You will also be taught how to beat your opponent's defenses once on the shot.

    Reader demonstrates how to finish from the inside single with two primary options based on the opponent's reaction.

    • Shelf and Circle - Primary finish on the mat to circle behind and secure a takedown.
    • Knee Slide to the Feet - Secondary finish on the mat if your opponent is defending with a whizzer and will allow you to take the single leg to your feet.

    High Crotch from the Underhook

    You'll be taught multiple techniques to move your opponent in order to get to your underhook and in position to hit a high crotch. Reader teaches a lesser known technique he calls the "meat hook" in order to set up your opponent. He also does an excellent job of showing how to properly hit and finish the high crotch from head, foot, hand and chest position.

    Getting to a Front Headlock

    The front headlock is a dominant tie that many wrestlers have difficulty defending. This will make your offense more effective. Learn the proper positioning to get into and use the front headlock. Reader covers three simple ways to get into a front headlock (including how not to get your arm trapped) from your feet:

    • Meat hook - His favorite set-up to create space in order to secure a front headlock.
    • Outside head pull - Great if you cannot create space off the meat hook.
    • Push-Pull - Allows you to use an opponent's momentum when their head is underneath your chest.

    He also goes over front headlock safety, shows two ways to counter common defense used by opponents, and the most effective way to finish a front headlock with a go behind.

    Scoring with a Front Headlock

    Reader demonstrates how to score with a front headlock based on realistic reactions that a wrestler might experience during a match.

    • Shoulder Shimmy - Allows you free your elbow to score if your opponent is clamping down on your arm.
    • Elbow Push - Used to score if your opponent reaches out and tries to block you from going behind them with their arm.
    • Head Pull - An effective way to get your opponent's elbow to the mat and open your go behind to score.
    • Big Step - Creates an angle to score on your opponent when they defend in a tripod and a head pull isn't working.
    • Far Knee Tap - Great way to score when an opponent gains elbow control and is focused on clearing the front headlock.

    Reader also covers how to clear a front head lock and several drills to help develop mastery from the front headlock, such as a push-pull drill, angle positioning drill, and a snap-hustle drill.

    If you want to learn how to be able to get in the underhook position in order to attack or control your opponent, then this is the video for you!

    70 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Herb Stinson,
    former Aztec (NM) High School Head Coach;
    member of the National High School Athletic Coaches Association (NHSACA) Hall of Fame (2016);
    Wrestling USA Magazine National Coach of the Year (1991);
    3x NWCA National High School Coach of the Year ('91, '95, '00);
    12x NM High School State Champions, including 11 in a row (1990-2000);
    6x New Mexico A/3A State Coach of the Year;
    coach 65 individual State Champions and won 139 tournament championships; over 500 career wins

    National Hall of Fame Coach Herb Stinson has produced 65 individual state champions and coached 12 state championship teams during his coaching career. One of the reasons he's had great success is his ability to build a program from the ground up. Stinson understands that in order to mold a successful program, you need to develop wrestlers at all levels.

    Coach Stinson opens up his practice room and shows what his team works on to become a dominant wrestling program. He maximizes the amount of drilling covered in a practice by incorporating techniques into warm-ups. Coach Stinson has his wrestlers demonstrate the drills that have helped elevate Aztec High School wrestling, such as the takedown system and breakdown system.

    Takedown System

    Coach Stinson has his wrestlers demonstrates the basics of inside singles, outside singles, and Russians.

  • Inside Singles: Used to score when an opponent is stationary or backing up.
  • Outside Singles: A great way to score when an opponent pressures into you.
  • Russian to a Heel Pick: Catch an opponent's far ankle when they step their inside leg back.
  • Russian to Fireman's Carry: Used when an opponent has their weight on their heels.
  • Russian to a Stretch: A simple and effective takedown when an opponent is on their toes.
  • Coach Stinson also demonstrates several valuable drills that can increase a wrestler's takedown percentage, such as half body attacks, rope drills, and choreograph shots.

    Breakdown System

    Stopping your opponent's first move off the bottom and then learning to do a safe turn is important in building a program with young wrestlers. Stinson-coached teams are known for their tilts from top. This has led opponents to focus solely on keeping their wrist away while on bottom. Stinson has developed five key breakdowns to break any opponent flat and secure the wrist.

    • Pinch: A great first move to stop an opponent and trap their ankle.
    • Knee Swipe: Allows you to capture the far knee and put an opponent on their hip.
    • Arm Chop: Gives you the opportunity to trap the arm off the whistle and immediately go into a tilt.
    • Knee Jam: Allows for a wrestler to use their knee to drive an opponent flat.
    • Spiral: A great breakdown to put an opponent on their butt.

    Note: This section is a great complement to Coach Stinson's Tiger Tilt video (item#: WRD-05146).

    Practice Session

    See firsthand what an Aztec High School practice looks like, when Coach Stinson takes his team through a typical end-of-season practice from start to finish. You will have the opportunity to see the warm-up, live wrestling, and cool down.

    The warm-up is one of the most important aspects of the practice, because it's a time when the athletes will not only fine tune their technique, but also work on developing their strength, flexibility and overall conditioning. You'll understand the importance of drilling and how gaining more repetitions in all positions will allow for a wrestler to get better. A unique feature of Aztec practices is that a variety of conditioning drills are implemented during the practice session rather than after.

    The live wrestling consists of short situational scrambles with a partner, small group takedowns with King of the Mat, and technique-specific live wrestling out of the claw ride. Coach Stinson reinforces proper technique while encouraging his wrestlers to maintain a fast practice pace. This section of the video will allow you to better understand how to structure live wrestling for a practice.

    Strength & Conditioning - Peaking For State

    Wrestling consists of technique, strength and conditioning. Coach Stinson shows you how to get the conditioning needed and peak in time for the state tournament. See how he conditions his team in the last six weeks building up to the state tournament. This is a three day per week workout to get properly conditioned.

    • Morning Circuit Lift - Learn the 17 different lifts that the team does two mornings a week prior to school. Wrestlers need to have good explosive power. Stinson has designed a series of lifts that are 20 seconds on with a 10 second rest in order to get to the next station. Learn what order he puts the lifts in to maximize the conditioning of his wrestlers. Wrestlers will hit a fatigue level during this workout. This helps wrestlers learn to work through this fatigue to reach the maximum conditioning level and body coordination.
    • Running Work -Stinson teaches you how he alters workouts during the weeks leading up to the state tournament to include basic running, interval running, stair running and explosive running in order to peak at the right time before state.
    • Plyometric Box Workouts -Coach Stinson shows you how he uses plyo boxes to build explosive power and quickness. He shows a variety of hurdles, single touches, double touches and launches.

    Get insights to develop a system of wrestling perfected by the great Coach Stinson with this in-depth 'Open Practice' video!

    80 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Matt Meuleners,
    Brown University Assistant Coach;
    former University of Nebraska Assistant Coach;
    Back-to-Back NCAA D-II National Champion and 4x All-American at Northern State University

    and Lindsey Remmers,
    Director of Performance Nutrition at the University of Nebraska; works specifically with the University of Nebraska wrestling team

    Matt Meuleners shows you the tricks and techniques he used to win two NCAA D-II titles. He demonstrates multiple attacks - focusing heavily on the high crotch and single leg - from multiple tie-ups and positions. Although the technique is designed for heavyweights, it is applicable to athletes of all sizes. His skill set is universal and he's masterful at teaching the little details that make it so effective for everyone.

    Lindsey Remmers has been working specifically with the Nebraska wrestling team. Therefore, she understands the constant need of wrestlers to maintain their weight and the rigors and demands of the sport. She presents a deeper understanding of the importance of correct eating habits and strategies to ensure your wrestlers are able to always make weight in a safe and effective manner - without draining them and optimizing their peak performance.

    On the Mat: Shot setups from ties, defense and short-offense

    Coach Meuleners learned to use his size and skill to defeat some of the toughest wrestlers in the nation. He breaks down his best techniques for positions that heavyweights notoriously use to slow matches down.

    Collar Ties

    Learn how to get an inside tie when your opponent collar ties you, and how to adjust your stance so your posture doesn't get broken down. From the inside tie, you will learn a couple of offensive options depending on the reactions of your opponent.

    From offensive collar ties, you will see how to get to a single leg when your opponent tries to get an inside tie, and how to get to a high crotch after switching to another collar tie with your opposite hand.

    Modified 2-on-1

    The modified 2-on-1 resembles a reverse arm drag in regard to hand position. This tie is great because as you circle into it, you have an excellent chance of getting deep into a high crotch, which is low risk and requires minimal effort; or, if your opponent squares up as you are circling in, he presents you with the opportunity to get a snatch single.

    Underhooks

    The number one move for a heavyweight from an underhook should be the snatch single on the same side. Meuleners goes into detail on how to get to the snatch single and finish it. If your opponent has head position, he shows how to easily snap the opponent down and get to a front head lock.

    As a smaller heavyweight, Meuleners became well-versed on how to clear underhooks and turn them to his advantage. He demonstrates three easy and simple ways to clear and get out of the underhook.

    Leg Attack Defense and Counter Offense

    Meuleners will explain why the common reaction of pulling your leg back while trying to defend either of them is incorrect. After successfully defending the leg attack, Meuleners combines this with a section on short offense. He demonstrates ways to score when:

    • Your opponent starts standing.
    • Your opponent grabs the elbow you are using to hold the front head lock.
    • Your opponent starts quad podding.

    Lecture: Nutrition for Wrestling

    Lindsey Remmers dispels outdated, dangerous methods of weight-cutting and sheds new light on how to make weight in a safe manner that optimizes performance and eliminates the feeling of hunger, which plagues most wrestlers when it comes time to make weight.

    Remmers illustrates the importance of eating proper meals throughout the day, and how this optimizes an athlete's muscle mass, reduces the level of body fat, and prevents the temptation to binge eat. Explanations are given on how consistently eating right can help wrestlers lose weight, and dispels the misconception that eating frequently hinders weight loss, when it actually speeds up metabolism. She provides examples of what could be consumed during the day at breakfast, pre-workout meals, and post-workout meals.

    Recovery

    It's common for wrestlers to skip eating something immediately after practice, for fear of gaining weight. Scientific studies are used to show that consuming carbohydrates and proteins during the early phases of recovery will positively affect exercise performance. Remmers also dispels the common misunderstanding that you must consume the largest portion of protein after working out, stressing that for optimal muscle building, protein should be consumed throughout the day.

    Weight Loss and Weight Gain

    Since dehydration plays such a big part in weight-cutting and wrestling culture in general, Remmers provides recommendations on what percentage wrestlers should stay above their weight division hydrated to make for an easy cut. If they follow the recommendations carefully, then when it comes time to cut weight, they will have roughly 1 to 2 pounds to lose.

    Graphs are displayed to give an example of the eating and hydration pattern a wrestler should follow when they are either trying to gain weight and move up a weight class, or lose weight. Additionally, several tips that adhere to safe practices for in-season weight-making are provided to help wrestlers lose any extra weight they might be concerned about. This will teach wrestlers how to eat correctly, maintain a feeling of satiety throughout the day, and perform optimally come competition time.

    Produced at the 2017 USA Wrestling Silver Coaches Clinic in Lincoln (NE).

    124 minutes (2 DVDs). 2018.


    0 0

    WRD-05313A:

    with Bill Zadick,
    US National Freestyle Head Coach;
    2018 UWW World Cup Champions (Freestyle);
    2017 World Team Champions (Men's Freestyle);
    2006 Freestyle World Champion, 1996 NCAA Division I National Champion (University of Iowa)

    and Jon Pfeifer,
    University of Nebraska Wrestling Strength Coach; NSCA-Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist

    Ever wonder what the difference is between the American freestyle and what's happening on the international scene? In this video, USA Men's National Freestyle Coach Bill Zadick breaks down the major trends in international wrestling that allowed the Men's National Freestyle team to capture their first team World Championship since 1995.

    Additionally, Jon Pfeifer breaks down the approach he has used at the University of Nebraska to produce of one of the toughest, best-conditioned teams in the NCAA. He walks you through their approach for each phase of the year and how he works with different weight classes and builds specific lifting programs for them during the season to help build or maintain strength.

    On the Mat: Trends in International Wrestling

    For many wrestlers and coaches in America, NCAA wrestlers are the most studied and imitated. Relatively little attention is paid to the techniques and trends in the broader world of freestyle wrestling, where the best wrestlers in the world compete.

    Bill Zadick has been through it all, from winning a National Title to winning a World Championship. He has coached the best in the world and now brings his insight to you. Coach Zadick has broken down international freestyle wrestling to see what other countries are doing to gain the advantage.

    Head Positioning

    Too often, coaches focus simply on maintaining a good stance, when in fact the most important thing to do is to control the head position battle. Using the example of Iranian wrestlers, Zadick breaks down an approach that will allow wrestlers to keep opponents off their legs while creating their own angles. He also shows a variety of drills and hand fighting methods that will create angles that allow for leg attacks against the fastest and most disciplined opponents.

    Underhook Defense

    The underhook is the most advantageous control tie in the current world of freestyle wrestling, as it allows the underhooking wrestler to push forward, scoring push outs and controlling the center of the mat for shot clock purposes. Zadick breaks down the drills being used by national team wrestlers to prevent leg attacks and clear the tie quickly. He puts special emphasis on the current methodology being used by the national team to prevent push outs.

    Par Terre Defense

    Par Terre is an area of freestyle wrestling where Americans have traditionally struggled - it's completely different from the mat wrestling found in folkstyle. Zadick breaks down the finer details of hip movement and scooting that are necessary to prevent an experienced and skilled opponent from completing a gut wrench turn.

    Coach Zadick breaks down the trends in the modern freestyle world, with many ideas into how one can incorporate this into developing your program and athletes for both the short and long term. He also provides many cutting edge insights into the techniques, approaches and styles of the current national team members, and many other international competitors.

    Lecture: Year-Round Strength Training for Wrestling

    Strength and conditioning plays a key role in the performance of any wrestler, whether it's the strength to finish a takedown or complete a stand-up, the quickness and explosiveness needed for a high-level shot, or the endurance required to fight through the third period and overtimes.

    Managing Different Phases in a Yearly Cycle

    Too often, coaches and wrestlers make the mistake of trying to tackle everything at once: strength, size, explosiveness, conditioning and wrestling skill. University of Nebraska Wrestling's Strength Coach, Jon Pfeifer, explains that this is impossible, and that these skills need to be emphasized during different parts of the year. Breaking the year down into four seasons - pre-season, in-season, post-season, and off-season - he explains how to tackle weight training and conditioning during each phase, and how to balance time on the wrestling mat and in the weight room during each season.

    Wrestling Specific Training

    Frequently, strength programs are adopted from templates designed for football or power lifting. They don't account for the unique demands of wrestling, specifically the overwhelming importance of training grip and neck strength. Pfeifer explains how they approach training these muscles, which frequently require a different approach than lifts like squats or deadlifts. He delves further into how they have programmed other wrestling-specific workouts, like banded resistance shots, weighted stance and motion drills, and footwork drills.

    Coach Pfeifer details a specific approach to training wrestlers year-round (in fact, over multiple years), to get the most out of time spent in the weight room. Additionally, he gives you the tools to make your own decisions and adjustments in order to fulfill your program's needs.

    Produced at the 2017 USA Wrestling Silver Coaches Clinic in Lincoln (NE).

    163 minutes (2 DVDs). 2018.



    WRD-05313B:

    with Matt Meuleners,
    Brown University Assistant Coach;
    former University of Nebraska Assistant Coach;
    Back-to-Back NCAA D-II National Champion and 4x All-American at Northern State University

    and Lindsey Remmers,
    Director of Performance Nutrition at the University of Nebraska; works specifically with the University of Nebraska wrestling team

    Matt Meuleners shows you the tricks and techniques he used to win two NCAA D-II titles. He demonstrates multiple attacks - focusing heavily on the high crotch and single leg - from multiple tie-ups and positions. Although the technique is designed for heavyweights, it is applicable to athletes of all sizes. His skill set is universal and he's masterful at teaching the little details that make it so effective for everyone.

    Lindsey Remmers has been working specifically with the Nebraska wrestling team. Therefore, she understands the constant need of wrestlers to maintain their weight and the rigors and demands of the sport. She presents a deeper understanding of the importance of correct eating habits and strategies to ensure your wrestlers are able to always make weight in a safe and effective manner - without draining them and optimizing their peak performance.

    On the Mat: Shot setups from ties, defense and short-offense

    Coach Meuleners learned to use his size and skill to defeat some of the toughest wrestlers in the nation. He breaks down his best techniques for positions that heavyweights notoriously use to slow matches down.

    Collar Ties

    Learn how to get an inside tie when your opponent collar ties you, and how to adjust your stance so your posture doesn't get broken down. From the inside tie, you will learn a couple of offensive options depending on the reactions of your opponent.

    From offensive collar ties, you will see how to get to a single leg when your opponent tries to get an inside tie, and how to get to a high crotch after switching to another collar tie with your opposite hand.

    Modified 2-on-1

    The modified 2-on-1 resembles a reverse arm drag in regard to hand position. This tie is great because as you circle into it, you have an excellent chance of getting deep into a high crotch, which is low risk and requires minimal effort; or, if your opponent squares up as you are circling in, he presents you with the opportunity to get a snatch single.

    Underhooks

    The number one move for a heavyweight from an underhook should be the snatch single on the same side. Meuleners goes into detail on how to get to the snatch single and finish it. If your opponent has head position, he shows how to easily snap the opponent down and get to a front head lock.

    As a smaller heavyweight, Meuleners became well-versed on how to clear underhooks and turn them to his advantage. He demonstrates three easy and simple ways to clear and get out of the underhook.

    Leg Attack Defense and Counter Offense

    Meuleners will explain why the common reaction of pulling your leg back while trying to defend either of them is incorrect. After successfully defending the leg attack, Meuleners combines this with a section on short offense. He demonstrates ways to score when:

    • Your opponent starts standing.
    • Your opponent grabs the elbow you are using to hold the front head lock.
    • Your opponent starts quad podding.

    Lecture: Nutrition for Wrestling

    Lindsey Remmers dispels outdated, dangerous methods of weight-cutting and sheds new light on how to make weight in a safe manner that optimizes performance and eliminates the feeling of hunger, which plagues most wrestlers when it comes time to make weight.

    Remmers illustrates the importance of eating proper meals throughout the day, and how this optimizes an athlete's muscle mass, reduces the level of body fat, and prevents the temptation to binge eat. Explanations are given on how consistently eating right can help wrestlers lose weight, and dispels the misconception that eating frequently hinders weight loss, when it actually speeds up metabolism. She provides examples of what could be consumed during the day at breakfast, pre-workout meals, and post-workout meals.

    Recovery

    It's common for wrestlers to skip eating something immediately after practice, for fear of gaining weight. Scientific studies are used to show that consuming carbohydrates and proteins during the early phases of recovery will positively affect exercise performance. Remmers also dispels the common misunderstanding that you must consume the largest portion of protein after working out, stressing that for optimal muscle building, protein should be consumed throughout the day.

    Weight Loss and Weight Gain

    Since dehydration plays such a big part in weight-cutting and wrestling culture in general, Remmers provides recommendations on what percentage wrestlers should stay above their weight division hydrated to make for an easy cut. If they follow the recommendations carefully, then when it comes time to cut weight, they will have roughly 1 to 2 pounds to lose.

    Graphs are displayed to give an example of the eating and hydration pattern a wrestler should follow when they are either trying to gain weight and move up a weight class, or lose weight. Additionally, several tips that adhere to safe practices for in-season weight-making are provided to help wrestlers lose any extra weight they might be concerned about. This will teach wrestlers how to eat correctly, maintain a feeling of satiety throughout the day, and perform optimally come competition time.

    Produced at the 2017 USA Wrestling Silver Coaches Clinic in Lincoln (NE).

    124 minutes (2 DVDs). 2018.




    0 0

    with Bill Zadick,
    US National Freestyle Head Coach;
    2018 UWW World Cup Champions (Freestyle);
    2017 World Team Champions (Men's Freestyle);
    2006 Freestyle World Champion, 1996 NCAA Division I National Champion (University of Iowa)

    and Jon Pfeifer,
    University of Nebraska Wrestling Strength Coach; NSCA-Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist

    Ever wonder what the difference is between the American freestyle and what's happening on the international scene? In this video, USA Men's National Freestyle Coach Bill Zadick breaks down the major trends in international wrestling that allowed the Men's National Freestyle team to capture their first team World Championship since 1995.

    Additionally, Jon Pfeifer breaks down the approach he has used at the University of Nebraska to produce of one of the toughest, best-conditioned teams in the NCAA. He walks you through their approach for each phase of the year and how he works with different weight classes and builds specific lifting programs for them during the season to help build or maintain strength.

    On the Mat: Trends in International Wrestling

    For many wrestlers and coaches in America, NCAA wrestlers are the most studied and imitated. Relatively little attention is paid to the techniques and trends in the broader world of freestyle wrestling, where the best wrestlers in the world compete.

    Bill Zadick has been through it all, from winning a National Title to winning a World Championship. He has coached the best in the world and now brings his insight to you. Coach Zadick has broken down international freestyle wrestling to see what other countries are doing to gain the advantage.

    Head Positioning

    Too often, coaches focus simply on maintaining a good stance, when in fact the most important thing to do is to control the head position battle. Using the example of Iranian wrestlers, Zadick breaks down an approach that will allow wrestlers to keep opponents off their legs while creating their own angles. He also shows a variety of drills and hand fighting methods that will create angles that allow for leg attacks against the fastest and most disciplined opponents.

    Underhook Defense

    The underhook is the most advantageous control tie in the current world of freestyle wrestling, as it allows the underhooking wrestler to push forward, scoring push outs and controlling the center of the mat for shot clock purposes. Zadick breaks down the drills being used by national team wrestlers to prevent leg attacks and clear the tie quickly. He puts special emphasis on the current methodology being used by the national team to prevent push outs.

    Par Terre Defense

    Par Terre is an area of freestyle wrestling where Americans have traditionally struggled - it's completely different from the mat wrestling found in folkstyle. Zadick breaks down the finer details of hip movement and scooting that are necessary to prevent an experienced and skilled opponent from completing a gut wrench turn.

    Coach Zadick breaks down the trends in the modern freestyle world, with many ideas into how one can incorporate this into developing your program and athletes for both the short and long term. He also provides many cutting edge insights into the techniques, approaches and styles of the current national team members, and many other international competitors.

    Lecture: Year-Round Strength Training for Wrestling

    Strength and conditioning plays a key role in the performance of any wrestler, whether it's the strength to finish a takedown or complete a stand-up, the quickness and explosiveness needed for a high-level shot, or the endurance required to fight through the third period and overtimes.

    Managing Different Phases in a Yearly Cycle

    Too often, coaches and wrestlers make the mistake of trying to tackle everything at once: strength, size, explosiveness, conditioning and wrestling skill. University of Nebraska Wrestling's Strength Coach, Jon Pfeifer, explains that this is impossible, and that these skills need to be emphasized during different parts of the year. Breaking the year down into four seasons - pre-season, in-season, post-season, and off-season - he explains how to tackle weight training and conditioning during each phase, and how to balance time on the wrestling mat and in the weight room during each season.

    Wrestling Specific Training

    Frequently, strength programs are adopted from templates designed for football or power lifting. They don't account for the unique demands of wrestling, specifically the overwhelming importance of training grip and neck strength. Pfeifer explains how they approach training these muscles, which frequently require a different approach than lifts like squats or deadlifts. He delves further into how they have programmed other wrestling-specific workouts, like banded resistance shots, weighted stance and motion drills, and footwork drills.

    Coach Pfeifer details a specific approach to training wrestlers year-round (in fact, over multiple years), to get the most out of time spent in the weight room. Additionally, he gives you the tools to make your own decisions and adjustments in order to fulfill your program's needs.

    Produced at the 2017 USA Wrestling Silver Coaches Clinic in Lincoln (NE).

    163 minutes (2 DVDs). 2018.


    0 0

    with Kevin Dresser,
    Iowa State University Head Coach;
    former Virginia Tech Head Coach; 2017 ACC Co-Coach of the Year;
    2016 NWCA Coach of the Year;
    three straight ACC Dual Meet Champions (2015-17); Back-to-Back ACC Tournament Champions (2013-14);
    former Christiansburg (VA) High School Head Coach,
    5x Virginia Group AA State Champions;
    1986 NCAA Champion and 2x All-American wrestler at the University of Iowa

    Are you wondering what you can do to improve practice? Do you want to know if you're doing the right things? Many coaches spend time wondering if what they're doing is the right thing for their team.

    Kevin Dresser has experienced great success in high school and college as a coach. In this video, he describes some of the biggest mistakes he has made as a coach. He also passes on what he's learned from those mistakes to allow you an opportunity to avoid making the same mistakes.

    Coach Dresser's Keys to Success

    The first part of the video outlines what Dresser calls his practice 'anatomy.' He has eight general steps that he uses everyday leading into his competition weekend. These begin with warm-ups (when to warm up hard and when to warm up subdued) and complete with live wrestling. He bookends these steps with a pre-practice talk and closes with an exit message. These are both important to the athlete as you bring them into a practice, as well as when you send them forward from practice.

    'The 5 Biggest Mistakes a Coach Can Make'

    Coach Dresser follows up practice plans with his five biggest mistakes that you can make as a coach. These come from many years being on one side of the whistle. The biggest one is not showing every move you know. Your athletes will learn the flashy/fun stuff on their own, but to win, they have to be good at the basics.

    Dresser is also a huge proponent of the team concept, even as far as how he utilizes his staff and communication with those over him in the food chain. He concludes with an insightful, experience-laden perspective on warning signals of over-training (especially high school athletes).

    'The 5 Most Important Things to Build a Championship Program'

    Coach Dresser completes his session by sharing program-building philosophies. Thoughts on building from the ground up in your school, becoming someone who is respected and embodies the values you will want in your athletes such as hard work. The 'grassroots' style of program building will eventually get people into the seats and have your community, parents and administrators supporting you. He emphasizes the team concept once again, but places more importance on self-development and out-working everyone else you compete against.

    Success isn't just measured in wins and losses; it has to be also measured in the incremental steps necessary to get to the top and then sustain it. Whether you are a rookie coach, or have been coaching for numerous years, this video contains information that anyone can use to grow!

    35 minutes. 2018.


older | 1 | 2 | (Page 3) | 4 | newer